Hiking On in Tennessee

16 thoughts on “Hiking On in Tennessee”

  1. I suspect your mystery plant could be some wild version of hosta which is a relative of wild plantain. The way the leaves unfold from around each other makes it look that way to me. Does it flower at all?

    It would help if you get a closer view of the plant from the side to be sure.

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  2. And I forgot to add that I understand what you are saying about being grateful for what you have. There is a lot to be said for focusing on your blessings and not fussing over what you don’t have.

    I love 💕 ❤️ your pictures! What is the inside of that barn like? Does it include a shower?

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    1. The side of the barn was cut out toward the view and there were platforms for people to sleep in. There was a picnic table in front of that, plus a fire ring. There was an upper level for sleeping too, but I didn’t see if it was one giant floor up there. No shower. 😦 …but there was a privy! Most of the shelters in TN do not have privies!

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  3. And I forgot to add that I understand what you are saying about being grateful for what you have. There is a lot to be said for focusing on your blessings and not fussing over what you don’t have.

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  4. Oh the joys of hanging a food bag. It gives me about as much pleasure as blowing up my sleeping pad!

    That chimney was part of an old hotel read below.
    In 1884, Civil War Union General John T. Wilder constructed a luxury resort atop Roan Mountain which straddled the TN/NC line. My favorite story about the three-story hotel was that there was a line painted across the floor (and banquet table!) of the dining room indicating the state line. This demarcation was of practical importance to guests as the consumption of alcohol was allowed in Tennessee, but illegal in North Carolina. Legend has it that a local sheriff from NC would linger about the dining room hoping to catch a patron crossing the line with his or her drink. Guests would arrive in what is today the town of Roan Mountain, TN by narrow gauge railroad and then ride up the mountain by carriage. Sometime after 1910, Wilder ceased operations, the hotel was dismantled and ultimately the property was sold to the US Forest Service. Today, visitors can roam the mountaintop where the hotel once stood and enjoy the views. The Appalachian Trail passes by this site which is a great place to photograph wildflowers.

    Beautiful tent spot near Overmountain Shelter.

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    1. When I had my rock bag, I would often get it over the limb on the first try after so many months of practice (except when others are watching.) Tying a rock to the cord throws everything off! …but you are correct-two of the chores I dislike. The Sea to Summit pad is so much easier than the Neo Air.

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      1. I’m glad to hear the Sea to Summit pad is meeting expectations! It is so wonderful to have encounters that remind us how grateful we can be. Thank you for sharing those with us.

        I am curious about how diligent you have to be out there with your bear bag hanging. I’ve heard different stories about it. I imagine bears don’t want to chance being around a lot of people, even to get food. I know that raccoons don’t mind people at all and will rob the food bags any time. I’m glad you could find a way to improvise!

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